Category Archives: Military

Military Veterans being deported.

I came across this the other day while I was roaming the internet. I hadn’t heard about it before, I thought if a immigrant served honorably in the Military they were granted citizenship.

Who among us, (Talking to Veterans now) finding it difficult to adjust back into the world when they got out didn’t have some sort of problem or run in with the law? I know I did and I was a “Cold War ” vet, didn’t see any combat. I got a DUI and spent a little time in county on another occasion but charges had to be dropped due to an illegal search. I know there’s probably a lot of vet’s that didn’t have any problems but I also know there’s an awful lot that do. I know two personally.

Personally, I think no expense or time should be spared to look at each case individually. Unless of course it’s a no brainer and the veteran is a absolute degenerate and violent criminal. Even still though that veteran deserves at the very least a full investigation that includes in my opinion a Psychiatric eval to see if he or she has PTSD or something that would prevent them from being a good citizen. And if they do have PTSD or some other disorder or inability to adjust to civilian life do to Military service it should be taken care of. The “Nanny State” or government already spends and wastes so much on freebies and fraud there should be no problem what so ever helping a veteran.

Anyone that knows me knows I’m totally against “Illegal Immigration” and believe it should be done right by going through the process and assimilating, I’ve blogged about it here many times. I protested and got interviewed ( not so favorably of course) by the Press Enterprise in my city when the legislators were considering a Immigration change for the city. It was me and I think two or three more compared to about fifty supporters of the legislation.

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I also support building the wall.

Anyways, that’s my two cents. Check out these stories and share your thought’s if you can, would really like to hear what others have to say on the subject.

Part one, excerpts from the article. “Army veteran Mario Martinez spent six years of his life fighting for the United States.

Now, he’s fighting for the right to keep living here.

Martinez, 54, was born in Mexico, but came to the U.S. as a young child and became a legal resident. He joined the Army, served with the 82nd Airborne Division, and earned an honorable discharge. But more than a decade after he left the service, he was convicted of a felony, putting his immigration status in jeopardy.

“One mistake shouldn’t make the rest of your life,” said Martinez, who spent four years in California state prison for an assault conviction stemming from a 2008 domestic violence case. “I mean I paid for what I did, I did my time. I did it quietly, went in and got out.”(“More than a decade after he left the Army, he was convicted of assault in a domestic violence case. It happened the night he found the body of his best friend, who had died by suicide. Martinez said he was upset and got into an argument with his girlfriend. At the trial, his girlfriend testified that it was a one-time event, but cuts to her cheek required stitches, according to court records.”)

He served four years in prison.

After Martinez served his time, he was handed over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency that handles deportation for the Department of Homeland Security. He spent another 10 months in detention, then was released on bond in 2014. He currently lives in Southern California, while he awaits a court date in his deportation case.

“ICE exercises prosecutorial discretion for members of the armed forces who have honorably served our country on a case-by-case basis when appropriate,” said Rodriguez. “Still, applicable law requires ICE to mandatorily detain and process for removal individuals who have been convicted of aggravated felonies as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act.

An executive order signed by President Trump on January 25 expands who can be deported to include not only those with criminal records, but non-citizens who have committed a “chargeable criminal offense.” Already immigrant arrests are up by a third, compared to last year, according to ICE data.

But the current enforcement policy on immigration has been shaped over decades by both Democratic and Republican presidents.

Many veterans and advocates point to a 1996 law, passed during the Clinton presidency, as laying the groundwork for current deportations. That law, called The Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, expanded the types of criminal convictions eligible for deportation. In the following decade, the U.S. deported 897,099 non-citizens after they served their criminal sentences, according to a 2007 report from Human Rights Watch, which based its findings on ICE data. During those years, 77 percent of the legal permanent residents were deported for non-violent offenses.” Continue to the article here.>Serving In the U.S. Military Won’t Protect These Veterans From Being Deported

Part two, excerpts from the article. “Signs of American military life are everywhere in the cramped Tijuana apartment: a U.S. flag hung on the wall, Army patches covered a camouflaged backpack, photos of uniformed men lined a shelf. HectorOutside

“It was very difficult to transition, the first couple months,” said Hector Barajas, a former U.S. Army paratrooper, who was deported to Mexico in 2010 and calls the apartment home.

He said when he first landed back to Mexico – a country he had little connection to since he left as a child in the 1980s ­- there was no network of veterans and no offices to help get him on his feet. He started reaching out to other veterans and soon turned his home into a shelter for deported veterans in Tijuana, many of whom needed help with even the most basic things as they adjusted to an unfamiliar city.

“That’s part of our job here: to make it easier for the men to find work, helping them find their IDs, where to go get their driver’s license,” said Barajas. “It’s difficult when you don’t really have anyone to help you out with that.” 

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Hector Barajas was pardoned by California Governor Jerry Brown in March this year, opening up the possibility of his return to family in Los Angeles. CREDIT DORIAN MERINA / AMERICAN HOMEFRONT 

He said he’s been in touch with nearly 60 deported veterans since October. His office keeps a database of about 350 veterans who have been deported to different cities in Mexico and countries further away, such as the Philippines, Honduras and Iraq. The two-story apartment in a residential part of eastern Tijuana has three cots upstairs and a tiny kitchen Barajas refers to as a chow hall. Together, the vets call this place, “the bunker.”

Barajas served two stints in the Army, including in the 82nd Airborne. But when he got out, he ran into trouble with the law. In 2002, he was sentenced to 3 years in prison for discharging a firearm from a vehicle. After prison he was deported, but then re-entered the U.S. illegally and was deported again in 2010, according to records from Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Barajas, now 40, said he regrets his actions, but doesn’t like to dwell on the past.

“I paid dearly for it and I am taking responsibility for putting myself in that position,” he said. “As far as being a productive member of society, let’s move forward.”

In March, California Governor Jerry Brown pardoned Barajas and two other veterans, noting their honorable service in the military. That pardon clears a major obstacle, but doesn’t guarantee their return.

Barajas is hoping to get his legal status back and reunite with his family in Southern California, including his 11-year-old daughter. For now, he spends his time helping other deported veterans ­- many of whom, he said, struggle after getting out of the military.

“Not too many people are willing to put on a uniform and go fight, and it’s the reason we have these freedoms today is because of these men and women,” he said. “When they came back, they came with trauma. We have PTSD. It’s military, it’s connected to their service. The reasons these men are going to make these mistakes and suffer is because of the military trauma.”

There are more than 11,000 non-citizens serving active duty in the military, according to the Pentagon. About a decade ago, that number was three times as high. Legal permanent residents are eligible to serve, and doing so can expedite the naturalization process. But citizenship is not automatic and many veterans leave the military without obtaining it.

Some described a confusing and time-consuming process, made harder by deployments and frequent moves. Others said that because they had grown up mostly in the U.S., they felt American and didn’t think to apply, especially while focused on the demands of military service.” Continue to the article here.> Deported Veterans Hope To Return To Nation They Fought For

Read about one success story of a deported Veteran, 31-year-old Daniel Torres.

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A “heartbroken, broke” Daniel Torres self-deported to Mexico.

Excerpt from the article. “The success story of the deported veterans community is 31-year-old Daniel Torres.

He moved to the US from Mexico when he was 15 when his father got a job as an electronic engineer in Utah.

At 18, his US visa expired but he stayed on illegally. At 21 he joined the Marine Corps.

“I said I was an American citizen when I wasn’t,” Daniel says.

He served in the army for four years, including a tour of Iraq, and had just signed up for a year-long deployment in Afghanistan when his chain of command discovered he was an undocumented immigrant.

They could have charged him with fraud but instead they let him leave the military when his contract expired.

“I couldn’t get employment, I couldn’t go to school, I couldn’t get a loan, I couldn’t do anything,” he says.

He left America voluntarily and moved back to Mexico where he went to law school, started working at the Deported Veterans Support House and applied for US citizenship.

It took five years, but last April he got it.

“My case was simple enough because I had no criminal record, I have no deportation record and they gave my citizenship,” he says.

He says being accepted back into the US felt “weird”.

“I had kind of given up on the United States,” he says.

“Then after a while I started realising we can make a difference — the biggest barrier was people didn’t know about it.

“Unless you were directly affected or a family member affected, no-one knew military members were being deported.

“So once we started breaking down that ignorance barrier we started seeing results, we started getting places,” he says.

He plans to move back to Utah to study law in the US to become a binational attorney.

But his victory is far from complete.

“I’m not celebrating until everyone gets to go home,” he says.”  Continue to the article here and read about three others that aren’t so lucky, two you’ve already met from the other article.> ‘These men and women return only when they die’

Google Search, US President Donald Trump said he was open to the idea of allowing deported veterans to return.

It seems to me both Democrats and Republicans should be able to work together on this. It looks like for now it’s only the Democrats, Republicans should be ashamed.

May 26, 2017 Press Release.
Preventing veterans from being deported and helping deported veterans get access to medical care

Washington, D.C. (May 26, 2017)—Congressman Juan Vargas (CA-51) reintroduced a bill package that will prevent veterans from being deported and help veterans that have been deported get access to the medical service they deserve. The Immigrant Veterans Eligibility Tracking System (I-VETS) Act of 2017Healthcare Opportunities for Patriots in Exile (HOPE) Act of 2017, and Naturalization at Training Sites (NATS) Act of 2017 are part of this legislative package.

“A number of our nation’s servicemembers are immigrants who answered the call to serve and protect our nation and our freedom,” said Rep. Vargas. “These bills will ensure that immigrant servicemembers are well informed on their path to naturalization and allow veterans who have been deported to access the health care services they need.” More here.> Rep. Juan Vargas Reintroduces Deported Veterans Bill Package

President Trump, keeping his promises has already done many positive thing’s for the Military. I hope he and the DOJ looks into this.

BTW, despite attacks from the left, right and “The Lamestream Media” the President had a pretty impressive first six months. 6mdt

As always, God bless America and you. 10429313_865151986832782_5379475790684628491_n

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This is crap. This needs to stop. VA waste.

This is ridiculous and shameful. With all the money this country wastes in the government, on welfare abuse, immigration, left leaning policies, refugees, the UN, this should not be. This should be one of the most smooth running organizations we have, we owe it to the Veterans. This makes me sick.

From the famed Sharyl Attkisson. Thank you. “A medical doctor-turned-whistleblower was part of a team that reviewed veterans’ medical files to see if they’re entitled to compensation for Agent Orange injuries. He says he caught reviewers pushing through files at an improbable rate, failing to give them a proper review and often denying vets their due. The company, a V.A. contractor, denies it.” Continue reading

The Final Toast. Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary.

Lengthy, but I thought you would enjoy reading about these brave American heroes.And soon they will be gone…….
THE FINAL TOAST
When
They bombed Tokyo 75 years ago.
They once were among the most universally admired and revered men in the United States .. There were 80 of the Raiders in April 1942, when they carried out one of the most courageous and heart-stirring military operations in this nation’s history. The mere mention of their unit’s name, in those years, would bring tears to the eyes of great Americans.
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Now only four survive.
After Japan ‘s sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, with the United States reeling and wounded, something dramatic was needed to turn the war effort around.
 Even though there were no friendly airfields close enough to Japan for the United States to launch a retaliation, a daring plan was devised. Sixteen B-25s
were modified so that they could take off from the deck of an aircraft carrier. This had never before been tried — sending such big, heavy bombers from a carrier.
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The 16 five-man crews, under the command of Lt. Col. James Doolittle, who himself flew the lead plane off the USS Hornet, knew that they would not be able to return to the carrier.
They would have to hit Japan and then hope to make it to China for a safe landing.
 
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But on the day of the raid, the Japanese military caught wind of the plan. The Raiders were told that they would have to take off from much farther out in the Pacific Ocean than
they had counted on. They were told that because of this they would not have enough fuel to make it to safety.
And those men went anyway. 
They bombed Tokyo and then flew as far as they could. Four planes crash-landed; 11 more crews bailed out, and three of the Raiders died. Eight more were captured; three were executed. 
Another died of starvation in a Japanese prison camp. One crew made it to Russia . 
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The Doolittle Raiders sent a message from the United States to its enemies, and to the rest of the world: We will fight. And, no matter what it takes, we will win. 
Of the 80 Raiders, 62 survived the war. They were celebrated as national heroes, models of bravery. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer produced a motion picture based
on the raid; “Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo ,” starring Spencer Tracy and Van Johnson, was a patriotic and emotional box-office hit, and the phrase became part of the national lexicon. In the movie-theater previews for the film, MGM proclaimed that it was presenting
the story “with supreme pride.”
 
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Beginning in 1946, the surviving Raiders have held a reunion each April, to commemorate the mission. The reunion is in a different city each year. In 1959, the city of Tucson ,
Arizona, as a gesture of respect and gratitude, presented the Doolittle Raiders with a set of 80 silver goblets. Each goblet was engraved with the name of a Raider.
 
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Every year, a wooden display case bearing all 80 goblets is transported to the reunion city. Each time a Raider passes away, his goblet is turned upside down in the case at the
next reunion, as his old friends bear solemn witness.
 
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Also in the wooden case is a bottle of 1896 Hennessy Very Special cognac. The year is not happenstance: 1896 was when Jimmy Doolittle was born. 
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There has always been a plan: When there are only two surviving Raiders, they would open the bottle, at last drink from it, and toast their comrades who preceded them in death.
 As 2013 began, there were five living Raiders; then, in February, Tom Griffin passed away at age 96. 
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What a man he was. After bailing out of his plane over a mountainous Chinese forest after the Tokyo raid, he became ill with malaria, and almost died. When he recovered, he was
sent to Europe to fly more combat missions. He was shot down, captured, and spent 22 months in a German prisoner of war camp.
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The selflessness of these men, the sheer guts … there was a passage in the Cincinnati Enquirer obituary for Mr. Griffin that, on the surface, had nothing to do with the war,
but that was emblematic of the depth of his sense of duty and devotion:
“When his wife became ill and needed to go into a nursing home, he visited her every day. He walked from his house to the nursing home, fed his wife and
at the end of the day brought home her clothes. At night, he washed and ironed her clothes. Then he walked them up to her room the next morning. He did that for three years until her death in 2005.”
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So now, out of the original 80, only four Raiders remain: Dick Cole (Doolittle’s co-pilot on the Tokyo raid), Robert Hite, Edward Saylor and David Thatcher. All are in their 90s.
They have decided that there are too few of them for the public reunions to continue.
 
The events in Fort Walton Beach marked the end. It has come full circle; Florida ‘s nearby Eglin Field was where the Raiders trained in secrecy for the
Tokyo mission. The town planned to do all it can to honor the men: a six-day celebration of their valor, including luncheons, a dinner and a parade.
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Do the men ever wonder if those of us for whom they helped save the country have tended to it in a way that is worthy of their sacrifice? They don’t talk about that, at least
not around other people. But if you find yourself near Fort Walton Beach this week, and if you should encounter any of the Raiders, you might want to offer them a word of thanks. I can tell you from first hand observation that they appreciate hearing that
they are remembered.
The men have decided that after this final public reunion they will wait until a later date — sometime this year — to get together once more, informally
and in absolute privacy. That is when they will open the bottle of brandy. The years are flowing by too swiftly now; they are not going to wait until there are only two of them.
They will fill the four remaining upturned goblets. And raise them in a toast to those who are gone. 
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This is why we stand for the National Anthem. This is what makes us great. To these Heroes and the ones that have followed in their footsteps and that will in the future, Thank you, God bless you and your families and God bless America.
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Help transitional and homeless Vet’s Saturday 8/27/16(Vets eat fre).

If you’re going to be  around Hemet, Ca , Winchester, Ca  Or in the Inland Empire on Saturday August 27th 2016. Come by and check this out. download

Hosted by Little Mountain Farm Co. Details, “Go country with Little Mountain Farm Co! Join us on August, 27th for a Farm to Table Fundraiser benefiting transitional/homeless veterans in the Inland Empire with food and clothing. Admission is FREE! Event sponsored by Virago Fitness. Music by Fool Moon. Enjoy Farm to Table Cuisine grown right here at Little Mountain Farm Co, a Beer & Wine Garden, a fun zone for the kids, and shop at local vendor booths”

Honoring our Military and raising funds to feed and clothe our transitional/homeless Veterans in the Inland Empire!

Gratitude

Kristie L. Restivo  “This is our 4th annual event we have done in honor of our son in law, LCpl. Hunter Hogan who was in KIA on June 23, 2012 in Afghanistan. Each year we have given our profits to different non profits. The first year being the USO, which helped our family greatly during the loss of Hunter. Over the last few years unfortunately we have struggled with finding legitimate organizations that were doing what they said they were doing for our Veterans. So we decided we could do some of the things we were passionate about with no overhead and the funds going directly to feed and clothe homeless veterans in the Inland Empire. We will actually be cooking the food and delivering it to them and all so providing them with clothing, shoes, personal care items. This year we will also, be working in conjunction with our local VFW posts.”

Facebook link  VFW Post 4379 “FireBase Outlaw”

” The March Air force base color guard will be at Go country for a cause! Ceremony will be from 2:00 – 2:30. Join us as we honor our military. Please invited Veteran’s and active military to this event. Veterans eat free, please sign in at the Veterans booth when you arrive.” 

Kenneth Rice, decorated Vietnam Veteran and owner of the Little Shop of Horns in Temecula will be singing our National Anthem!”

Melissa Schock  “So excited to be a part of this event!!! I’ll have tons of $5 jewelry and hair accessories to go around!!! Tons of styles and colors!!! Something for everyone!”  Paparazzi  Melissa

God bless America and you.

 

Fourth of July — The Birthday of Our Christian Nation

I wanted to share this inspirational e-mail I got From the Desk of Richard Thompson of Thomas More Law Center.  Love the video!

On this July 4th 2016 let’s not forget the author and finisher of our freedom, our forefathers and the men and women of our armed services who fight for our freedom.  The following is from the e-mail, enjoy and remember.

“As you celebrate the Fourth of July this weekend with family and friends, please take a moment to reflect on its true meaning—the Birth of our Christian Nation.”

George Washington, in his Farewell Address, proclaimed:
“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. ”
John Adams, another Founding Father agreed:
“Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people.  It is  wholly inadequate to the  government of  any other.”
Patrick Henry, who proclaimed “Give me Liberty or give me death,” declared:
“It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists, but by Christians: not on religions, but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ.”
Woodrow Wilson, 28th President of the United States, said:
“America was born a Christian nation.  America was born to exemplify that devotion to the elements of righteousness which are derived from the revelations of the Holy Scripture.”
Justice Brewer, in the 1892 case Church of the Holy Trinity v. United States, stated:
“… this is a Christian nation.”
Justice William O. Douglas, in the 1952 case of Zorach v. Clauson, wrote:
“We are a religious people whose institutions presuppose a Supreme Being…”
And the list goes on … 

The separation of church and state was never the intention of the First Amendment adopted by our Founding Fathers. The plain text simply prohibited the establishment of a national church. However, that all changed, beginning in the 1960’s when the U.S. Supreme Court in its opinions declared war on Christianity.

As you celebrate the Fourth of July weekend, please remember —

                     The Price of Freedom.
Take the time to honor the sacrifices for our freedom made by our fighting men and women throughout our history — From Lexington and Valley Forge, to Iraq and Afghanistan — and today, by our Special Forces in harm’s way in places known and unknown. Take a moment to thank our men and women in uniform and our veterans. And, please, pray for them.
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On behalf of all the Thomas More Law Center staff, I wish you a safe and happy Independence Day weekend.

Meaning of 4th of July Independence Day from Thomas More Law Center on Vimeo.

God bless America and you.